Friday, May 22, 2020

Essay on Internet On Modern Society - 898 Words

The Effect of the Internet on Modern Society In this day and age, the Internet is the new resource tool for the masses. It has changed the way we live in society and the way people interact with each other. As more and more people log on the Internet, it has undoubtedly changed the way people think and feel about each other and the world around us. When we begin to look at the ways it has changed society, we can clearly see many reasons to its assimilation into modern life. First, it has given people a new way to communicate, through E-mail and web cams. Secondly, it is a sort of modern library where anything imaginable can be researched, and finally, not only in the virtual sense has it changed the world but also in the physical sense.†¦show more content†¦As it turns out, computer and internet companies can not run themselves, which means, thousands of jobs need to be filled to help maintain the high level of quality in a product and to ensure that the company will run like a smooth oiled machine. But not only the ne w computer companies have created jobs for the masses, but every company with aspirations of the future needs these people with specialized training and intimate knowledge of networking and programming systems. Which means that a meat packing facility in Delaware needs someone who graduated college and majored in networking to help set up or maintain their network of computers. Schools are also changing the way they set up classes and almost all schools now have a computer school were any student can major in computer science and acquire great jobs with huge corporations. For a college to set up a computer school take a great amount of money. They would have to purchase hundreds of computers and hire technologically educated teachers, which do not come at a small price. This is an obvious sign that companies are looking for the most qualified technicians to work for them, and each school spends millions of dollars to have the best computer science program available. nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;The Internet in a virtual sense is something that, after its introduction into mainstream society, can not beShow MoreRelatedThe Influence of the Internet on Modern Society.1490 Words   |  6 PagesThe influence of the internet on modern society. CSC 1015 By Ryan Foreman 091811594 Introduction This essay focuses on the impact that the interent has had on modern society. I will give a brief history of the internet, talking about its origins and the key developments that have occured up until now. Then look at how the internet has changed society so far, including how it has changed social interactions, e-commerce and jobs. Also discussing the advantages and disadvatages of the interent andRead MoreThe Impact Of Modern Internet On Society1428 Words   |  6 Pagesconsumer driven society where we constantly want the latest product. Because of this huge demands for product production can go into overhaul this in turn is making the product cheaper. In a capitalist society it is all about supply and demand and as the supply increases the product becomes cheaper. Shapcott write in 1995 (Reference) that, The Internet isn t free. It just has an economy that makes no sense to capitalism. This essay will outline and explore the effect the modern internet is having onRead More The So cial Consequences of Communication Technologies Essay795 Words   |  4 Pageshave you spent on American Online Instant Messenger when you should have been studying for prelims? Communications shapes our modern society as well as brings many burdens and negative aspects along with it. It does not seem like it is even able to help most of the population of a developing country because most of the people in that country do not have access to modern communications technologies. Current telecommunications technology has enlarged our social lives decreasing our productive timeRead MoreSimilarities Between 1984 And 1984963 Words   |  4 Pages1984 Essay Although modern society may not be a totalitarian society, 1984 reflects many of modern society’s circumstances. Such as psychological understanding, surveillance technology, and wealth distribution. As a result of this, the society of 1984 may not be as far off from today as would seem, from 1984 societys wealth to standard of living, both places share many similarities. Both 1984 and modern society has developed a deep psychological understanding. 1984 expressed this understandingRead MoreSimilarities Between Dadaism And Internet Art1167 Words   |  5 Pagesfeelings of people in society, whether individually or as a whole. Usually art that vents the feelings of the artist occur around times or events that evoke emotions powerful enough to provide a muse for artwork. Some art styles, such as Dadaism and Internet Art, can directly tie their absurdist means to what was happening in that time. But do the time periods in which those art styles were popular relate to the meaning behind the art? The similarities between Dadaism and Internet/Postinternet art showRead MoreSimilarities Between Dadaism And Internet Art1172 Words   |  5 Pagesfeelings of people in society, whether individually or as a whole. Usually art that vents the feelings of the artist occur around times or events that evoke emotions powerful enough to provide a muse for artwork. Som e art styles, such as Dadaism and Internet Art, can directly tie their absurdist means to what was happening in that time. But do the time periods in which those art styles were popular relate to the meaning behind the art? The similarities between Dadaism and Internet/Postinternet art showRead MoreHow To Encourage People To Use Technology 793 Words   |  3 PagesHow To Encourage People To Use Technology The evolution of modern technology has certainly changed the way we live. Indeed, modern technology has evolved enormously and rapidly in recent years and has brought with it changes in our life of beneficial changes, and other harmful. What are the advantages of modern technology? (Legris, P., Ingham, J., Collerette, 2003) How is it harmful to humans? The evolution of technology has been beneficial to humans for several reasons. First, it facilitatesRead MoreEssay on The Benefits of Modern Methods of Communication1466 Words   |  6 Pagesanother area has decreased. Furthermore, the advantages of modern technologies are more convenient than in the past. The term modern methods of communication can be defined as the new ways of contacting, which are advantageous for human relationships and these modern technologies that give advantages to the values of society or to the principles of a community. Therefore, modern methods of communication have amplified the values of society, becau se they are useful for everyday life and offer moreRead MoreTechnology And Its Impact On Society1198 Words   |  5 PagesTechnology is used on a daily basis to accomplish specific tasks or interests. Modern technology increases human capabilities and this technology has evolved with years. Technology simplifies life in so many ways and everyone defines technology in their own way. They’re new types of technology on the market, this technology simplifies our daily lives. They’re endless demands as consumers of technology, people use technology to accomplish simple tasks every day. Technology’s used in business, educationRead MoreChildren and Technology: Growing Up in the Modern World Can Have Negative Effects on Children1011 Words   |  5 PagesChildren growing up in the modern world of today would rather stay inside and play on the internet, watch television, or play video games than go outside and play. Serious repetitive strain injuries suffered after spe nding hours glued to game consoles is up 60% since 2002 (Par. 5 Clarke). Technology and modern society have created lifestyle changes that are detrimental to the well being of children. First, this paper will discuss the effects of technology and modern society on the physical and mental

Friday, May 8, 2020

The Struggle Of The Civil War - 1492 Words

Many Texans contend that the Civil War was not fought over slavery, citing the limited number of slave-owning households in the state. While the majority of Texans did not own slaves, it would be inaccurate to argue that they were therefore against slavery. Texas, representative of other southern states that supported slavery, had a vested interest in preserving the institution at all costs, which is why they risked their lives over it. Moreover, Texans may argue that the civil war was about states’ rights or defense of the southern â€Å"way of life.† States’ rights, though part of the equation, played a diminished role as a whole in prompting the Civil War. Furthermore, because it revolved mostly around slavery, the southern â€Å"way of life†Ã¢â‚¬ ¦show more content†¦Slaves were especially needed for cotton, which was proven to be a major crop of Texas. Although only 1/3 of Antebellum Texas had slaves, they produced over 90% of the cotton grown in Texas, which allowed for most slave-owners to actually receive a profit, as opposed to putting their money towards a loan in the northeast to produce the crop (Campbell 207). As a result it is clear that slavery became a necessity for the Texas economy. Slavery was also the main cause of the Civil War because of the political ramifications associated with it. The argument Texans had about the Civil War and states’ rights can be defended in that the U.S. Constitution failed to specifically address slavery. Although many of our Founding Fathers hated slavery and spoke negatively about it, several owned slaves and relied on them. The states’ rights argument was essentially used to control votes in congress. The states’ rights argument was used to create the fear of setting an unfavorable precedent by allowing more states to enter the union without slaves, which could mean loss of votes for the South in the U.S. Congress. If the north expanded into the west and they were able to get more states to enter the Union, then the Confederacy would lose the votes in the US congress. Congress could then vote to abolish slavery throughout the Union. The concept of states’ rights is a political and economical issue for the South. If the South loses their rights to slavery then the

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

BP Deep Water Horizontal Explosion Free Essays

string(109) " of interests and inadequate information, decisions made under such condition were inconsistent and unclear\." BP originated from a British petroleum company founded in 1909. After experiencing crises during the 1980s-1990s, the company started to have a cost cutting culture. During mid-1990s, with an aggressive growth strategy, BP started to grow and reposition. We will write a custom essay sample on BP Deep Water Horizontal Explosion or any similar topic only for you Order Now After BP merged with Amoco in 1998, John Browne started to serve as chief executive until May 2007. Browne repositioned BP as a â€Å"green† oil company after he took over and practiced the model of organizational decision-making strategy, known as â€Å"asset federation. Under this new strategy, onsite asset managers had the authority to make decisions, and employees’ compensation was directly tied to asset performance (Ingersoll et. al, 4). Many decisions made by John Browne were directly related to the Deepwater Horizon explosion. In 2007, Tony Hayward replaced John Browne and became the new chief executive. Tony Hayward slightly adjusted BP’s organizational structure and decided to pay more attention to BP’s safety issues and risk averse culture. However, the Deepwater Horizon explosion happened when Tony Hayward was in charge. The BP Deepwater Horizon oil explosion occurred in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, which is considered as the largest accidental marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill caused tremendous damages to the surrounding environment and enormous losses to shareholders. BP acquired the right of operating the Macondo Well Project from the U. S. Minerals Management Service in 2009, and then BP leased the Deepwater Horizon rig from Transocean who provides offshore drilling equipment and personnel operation. Both BP and Transocean operated the Deepwater Horizon when the disaster happened. The Deepwater Horizon explosion resulted in major damages and losses. When the explosion occurred, workers abandoned ship and jumped into the burning ocean. Among the 126 workers on board the Deepwater Horizon, 17 were injured and 11 died. Additionally, the rig burned down 700,000 gallons of oil within 36 hours, and the smoke trail spread over 30 miles (Ingersoll et. al, 2). BP’s stock price declined dramatically after the explosion. The disaster not only dragged BP into the major scandal but also destroyed many surrounding businesses and families. The consequences of the explosion affected not only organization, shareholders, and employees but also the environment, social issues, and public relations. The Deepwater Horizon disaster had many causes, direct and indirect; it mainly involved people-issues, managers and managing, organizational weaknesses, and external oversight and accountability. â€Å"CAUSES† OF THE EXPLOSION Firstly, individuals in an organization always have decision-making biases, and thus they would have a â€Å"huge capacity to rationalize their behavior† (Crews). Individuals usually make decisions subjectively based on their value set. The former CEO John Browne set up how BP would develop after mid 90’s; he also was the key person who affected the future of Tony Hayward. Browne relied on and promoted Hayward. A metaphor in Elkind’s article said that Hayward was favored prince of Browne, and Browne opened Hayward’s eyes to the world of business (Elkind et. al, 9). It was not clear why Browne relied on Hayward so much, but he made Hayward become the CEO of BP. On the other hand, Browne played an important role in BP’s management strategy. Browne decided to focus on cutting costs and had a desire to make BP become the largest oil producer. He created the big picture of BP’s development, which influenced the future CEO Hayward’s value set of decision-making and employees’ behaviors in BP. Not only managers had bias of decision-making, the engineers who constructed and maintained the rig also had bias. BP chose long string casing for the Macondo well because several individuals overvalued the cost. As a result, the well casing choice created the condition of the rig’s explosion (Ingersoll et. al, 19). Additionally, the drilling engineers decided not to run the â€Å"cement bond log† test, and that test could accurately diagnose a bond failure to improve process safety. Mark Hafle, one of BP’s drilling engineers even claimed the cement job was working fine at court (Ingersoll et. al, 16). The drilling engineers of the Macondo project were warned about potential risks, but they willfully ignored the warnings and insisted everything would work fine. Such bias and rationalized behavior of drilling engineers just added another warning sign to the explosion of Deepwater Horizon. Secondly, BP’s business relationships are complex, and the legitimate priorities often conflict (Crews). BP’s failure to prevent the explosion was due in part to complex partnership. BP held the rights to drill using the rig and operation services leased from Transocean. As a result, â€Å"of the 126 people aboard the Deepwater Horizon, 79 were from Transocean, seven were from BP, and the rest were from other firms† (Ingersoll et. al, 1). People serving on Deepwater Horizon came from different organizations. A decision making process involved many authorities, which decreased the efficiency and effectiveness of decision-making. Even though BP maintained main operational authority, only six percent of people aboard the Deepwater Horizon rig were from BP. As an important business partner of BP, Transocean provided the equipment and performed the majority of the work, and thereafter it had some authority over operations and maintenance. The complex business partnership caused serious operational consequence. Upon the day of explosion, the Deepwater Horizon rig had been operating 29 days more than it should had been, and the leasing fee owed to Transocean far exceeded the budget (Ingersoll et. al, 7). It was a problem that both companies had authority of decision making over operation. This led to legitimate conflict of priorities. For example, when closing a well, â€Å"11 companies played a role in the construction of the casing for the Macondo well, and all with different responsibilities for various aspects of setting the well† (Ingersoll et. al, 9). Different companies made decisions based on their own company’s interest of cost, time, and safety. As a result, any decision-making process would be very time-consuming, given that all companies kept competing and were not willing to compromise. Because of the conflict of interests and inadequate information, decisions made under such condition were inconsistent and unclear. You read "BP Deep Water Horizontal Explosion" in category "Papers" The inefficient and ineffective decision-making processes slowed the progress of drilling and over-drafted the budget. If the drilling on Deepwater Horizon rig would have been completed within 51 days as expected, BP may have stopped a disaster. Thirdly, the misalignment occurs when managers’ words and action conflict. To prevent corporate scandals, managers’ actions are more powerful than words in shaping employees’ behavior and presenting a positive image to society (Crews). BP faced safety issues in last few decades. Even though each time its CEOs made a commitment to the public about safety, disasters still happened continuously. For instance, â€Å"in 2000, after a string of fires and equipment failures, CEO John Browne announced plans to ‘review the commitment to safety. † In 2005, the explosion of BP’s Texas City refinery killed 15 people; ironically, Browne swore to fix safety problems again like previously. The Deepwater Horizon spill, the worst one in history, happened two years after CEO Tony Hayward took over, and he had promised to focus on safety issue â€Å"like a laser† (Elkind et. al, 4). Empty promises are just like checks without sufficient funds. The conflic t of managers’ words and action caused the corporation lose credibility to the public. BP’s CEO kept vowing to correct safety issues, and the sequential disasters revoked their promises time after time. The U. S. Chemical Safety Board investigated BP’s real safety operation after the Texas City refinery explosion, and they found that BP Group failed to review its refinery operation systematically. Even though the Group Chief Executive claimed, â€Å"BP would learn lessons from Grangemouth and other incidents† (National Commission Chapter 8, 6), BP’s actions were against its public commitment. BP had desires to change, but it never improved in respect to safety weaknesses. BP emphasized personal safety instead of process safety, which led to the serious consequence (Elkind et. l, 5). BP’s board of directors failed to enhance process safety, and this helped BP lose credibility with the public. They needed to create an environment of safety concern to train employees from every level of the organization. Fourthly, BP’s managers were more concerned with seeking profits than with ethics (Crews). Employees’ performance was evaluated by ability of cost cutting and profit generating. For example, in 2008, BP introduced an â€Å"every dollar counts† program that aimed to reduce the costs of their drilling operation (Smith, 1). Another example would be that leaders of BP’s drilling team considered the $2. 2 million of incremental cost benefit over safety when they handled installation problem of lockdown sleeve (Smith, 2). Likewise, many other decisions of construction of the Macondo well were made based on cost and profit instead of safety concerns. BP’s failure was highly related to managers blindly seeking profit and ignoring safety issues. BP used Long-string casing, which made production less costly and shortened the time of return on investment (Deepwater Horizon Study Group, 56). This was one of the main causes of the explosion. Oil drilling is a highly risky industry, and BP was supposed to emphasize safety; however, managers valued profit over ethics, and that hastened up the failure of BP. Fifthly, an organization’s culture, structure, strategy, and resource allocation strongly affect the behaviors of managers and employees (Crews). BP’s organizational culture is cost cutting and risk taking, which directly affected managers’ decision-making. Since 1995 when John Bowne took over, he â€Å"imposed a tough bottom-line mentality† to focus on cutting costs. He also chose to give more operating authority to his managers. Bowne targeted aggressive profit growth by making his managers sign an annual performance contract (Elkind et. al, 8). BP’s organizational culture pushed CEOs to set profit as the primary goal. An organization’s culture is its personality, which implies how managers would operate the organization. With the cost-cutting culture, managers and employees made decisions driven by the organizational culture. Additionally, BP’s unethical management structure and strategy caused the bad competition between employees. BP had a management strategy, â€Å"asset federation. † BP’s onsite asset managers had â€Å"decision-making authority and responsibility for meeting performance targets;† moreover, onsite employees’ compensation was valued by overall performance of the site (Ingersoll et. al, 4). As a result, BP exploration sites had an unethical competition and were less likely to share best practice on risk management; that was a big concern for an oil company whose process safety was a problem. On the other hand, BP also had a weakness of high bureaucracy operating costs. BP had â€Å"a starched, rigidly hierarchical management culture;† for example, headquarter employees and senior employees had preferential treatment in company, which shows BP’s unbalanced and unsound reward system (Elkind et. al, 7). In other words, BP was weak in human resource management. The company rewarded employees by position instead of ethical behavior and good performance. A lack of focus on safety issues directly led to the explosion. BP’s â€Å"creative† management strategy introduced by John Browne made exploration onsite managers keep their best practice to themselves and blindly chase profit. Such management contributed to Deepwater Horizon explosion. Finally, external auditing and regulatory weaknesses also indirectly contributed to the explosion (Crews). Offshore oil drilling is a risky industry. Therefore, in some region, the government essentially banned it due to environmental concerns. However, in the Gulf, the environmental protections and safety regulation were relaxed and ineffective because the oil drilling would bring billions of dollars to federal government (National Commission Chapter 3, 3). Driven by revenue, the government and regulators id not put forth too many restrictions for oil industry in the Gulf. With this important advantage, BP continually neglected safety issues and took risks, which eventually caused the disaster. According to the national commission report, revenue increases when moving drilling deeper into the water, but the corresponding safety risks also increases; however, such increased risks were not covered by additional regularly over sight (National Commission Chapter 3, 3). Investigators found that Deepwater Horizon extended drilling by 18360 feet below sea level. BP drilled aggressively by ignoring the risks and consequences. However, regulators might be more than happy to accept the huge revenue contributions instead of considering environmental concerns and set restrictions. More importantly, the regulation and auditing office had a culture of revenue maximization. BP acquired the right of exploration from MMS. The national commission report points out that the MMS office had culture of accepting gifts from oil companies. An employee of MMS even negotiated with the oil company when he conducted inspections on this company’s oil platforms (National Commission Chapter 3, 23). Oil companies and public regulation office benefitted each other, and that made improvement of safety issue in entire oil industry became obstructive. The government did not provide strict regulation to an industry that could bring it money because more regulation means less revenue. Along with a long list of safety issues, BP risked drilling down below the sea to seek more oil and profit without additional auditing and regulation; all the factors pushed and forced the disaster happened. First, The Deepwater horizon explosion killed 11 people, and 17 were injured. The ocean was flaming when the rig became a graveyard. To those dead employees, their family had to face the loss of family members. Second, The Deepwater Horizon explosion affected BP’s and Transocean’s financial market. The sharp drop of stock price wiped out $91 million in market value. BP’s working capital that founded by $10 billion in short-term paper was shut out (Elkind et. al, 20). The credit situations of both companies weakened. Moreover, BP and Transocean had to pay for the damages by billions of dollars. Even two years later in 2012, BP still had $8. 3 billion on damage payouts caused by the explosion (Helman, 3). Both companies were required to pay for environmental restoration, damage to surrounding businesses, and cleanup cost. On the other hand, the explosion also destroyed the reputation of BP and Transocean, and scandals were harmful to two companies’ public relationship. After Deepwater Horizon explosion, the financial market for BP securities had a dramatically change. BP’s investors faced a huge loss on investment. BP’s stock price dropped more than 50%, and the stock and option trading volume increased instantly by fifteen to twentyfold. Interest rate of BP bonds increased, and the company announced the suspension of cash dividends to shareholders (Fodor and Stowe, 1). BP’s disaster made shareholders face a tremendous loss. The value of stocks in hand became worthless and the dividend payments might endless delay. Furthermore, the explosion also affected business in the gulf and the coast tourism industry. The disaster dramatically affected the Alabama coast, which depended on tourism: compared to 2009, the number of visitors decreased by 1 million, real estate values dropped by more than 65%, retail sale declined by 50% (Keegen, 2). The most affected business was fishing industry in the gulf. Since the spilling oil, many fishes were killed and many families whose life depended on fishing and tourist service were bankrupt instantly. In addition, the explosion affected the gulf coast ecosystem. After the explosion, the rig burned for 36 hours. Deepwater Horizon rig exploded about 100 miles southwest of Orange Beach,† and â€Å"more than 200 million gallons of crude went into the gulf† before July 15, 2010 (Keegen, 2). As a result, spilling oil â€Å"fouled beaches and shorelines,† and it destroyed gulf coast ecosystem; creatures and species were killed. The Deepwater Horizon explosion â€Å"created one of worst environmental disaster in U. S. history (Keegen, 2). Ba sed on a research of Texas A M’s Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, the real loss of gulf coast ecosystem and fisheries were huge and need decades for recovery (Keegen, 5). PREVENTION One of the reasons for BP’s failure is that top managers did not have ethical concerns. The safety issue is the major problem of BP; however, CEOs and managers were concerned for profit over safety concern. Internally, the Board of Directors should create a clear plan that focuses on addressing particular ethical needs for different situations. Additionally, BP should increase the responsibility of the Board of Directors in overseeing the managing executives. An organization should had ethical oversight, and it should provide employees ethical training to advocate ethical behavior. Management fault also was the main reason contributed to the explosion. BP had problems with management structure and management strategy. Managers who focused on cost cutting and wilfully ignored safety problem made numerous poor decisions. Employees should be rewarded by performance overall instead of the ability to cut cost. Rig managers and engineering leader should regard the warning signs and conduct safety test regularly. The managers should pay attention to â€Å"near misses† and avoid the â€Å"favorable wind direction,† and then they might be able to predict and prevent the crises (Tinsley et. l, 1). Considering all of the factors that contributed to Deepwater Horizon explosion, the root cause was the cost-cutting organizational culture. An organizational culture is the characteristic of a corporation; it affects people’s perspectives and values. Employees use the organizational culture to guide and rationalize their behavior. Therefore, directors of bo ard, executives, and top managers should create and inform employees with a positive organizational culture and build conditions for employees’ learning and appreciating. BP’s explosion had internal and external reason. Internally, BP Deepwater Horizon explosion involved two CEOs’ main decisions; besides, BP had a complex organizational strategy, management structure, and partnership. Externally, the outside weakness of legality and regulation contribute to BP’s ethical scandals. Thereafter, besides corporation internal control, the regulators should provide more specific regulations and auditing that conduct oil industry operating with a safer procedure. How to cite BP Deep Water Horizontal Explosion, Papers

Monday, April 27, 2020

Reservoir Dogs Essays - English-language Films, Films,

Reservoir Dogs "I don't give a fuck what you know or don't know, but I'm gonna torture you anyway, regardless. Not to get information. It's so amusing for me to torture a cop. All you can do is pray for a quick death, which you aint gonna get." Mr. Blonde in Reservoir Dogs, 1992 This guy was the most twisted and sickly perverted guy in the whole movie. He had no reservations about killing people. He was brutal. He loved torture and death. By his own admission he liked to see the peoples' expressions when they died. He was totally ruthless. He had no conscience. I can't really explain why I liked this character so much. I don't EVER want to be like him or do the things he did. There was just something attractive about all his negative personality traits. Before he really starts getting into torturing the cop, he casually turns on the radio as if he needed some music to accompany the grizzly acts he was about to commit. He was a man who insisted on having total control. He liked controlling situations and people. When they were in the jewelry store he advised the employees not to hit the alarm. When they did, he started killing them. This was his way of regaining control of the situation. At the same time he was acting out this concept, he was actually totally out of control. He went fucking crazy in the store. He slaughtered the people lined up in the store like he was shooting clay ducks in a local carnival shooting gallery. I know this is a contradiction, but Mr. Blonde was a contradiction of himself. He had double standards. He hated the cop just because he was a cop. He didn't recognize him as a real person. Mr. Pink and Mr. White confirm this at the warehouse when they discuss him shooting REAL people, which cops are not. They say he just went crazy. They seemed to fear his craziness. His calm facade was a cover for the monstrous things he did to people. When he was in the warehouse with the hostage cop and Mr. Orange he appeared to be very calm. He sat smoking a cigarette while Pink and White argued over the chain of events. He wasn't calm. He couldn't wait to start torturing the hostage cop. You could see it in his face when Pink and White left. He almost looked like a kid left alone to tend a candy store. He was up and going the second they left. He was oh so gruesomely true to his belief that cops weren't people that he begins to prove this through his torture "techniques". He treats the cop like an object as opposed to a human being. He slashes off his ear and speaks into it like it was a play phone. He dances over to the gas can, swirls around the warehouse floor and soaks the guy in gas. He taunts the man by lighting a cigarette and holding it over the puddle of gas. This was a thrilling game to him. He wanted to see this man suffer before he finally died. He was also true to his fellow thugs. When everyone else was panicking, he remained cool. He insisted they stick to their original plan...to the end. He told them he had spoken to Nice Guy Eddie and everything was to be done according to the original plan. Mr. Blonde was a messed up dude. His whole personality was a contradiction. Maybe that's why he was so hypnotizing. His bizarre behavior and calm facade made for a very unique character. Reservoir Dogs Essays - English-language Films, Films, Reservoir Dogs Reservoir Dogs "I don't give a fuck what you know or don't know, but I'm gonna torture you anyway, regardless. Not to get information. It's so amusing for me to torture a cop. All you can do is pray for a quick death, which you aint gonna get." Mr. Blonde in Reservoir Dogs, 1992 This guy was the most twisted and sickly perverted guy in the whole movie. He had no reservations about killing people. He was brutal. He loved torture and death. By his own admission he liked to see the peoples' expressions when they died. He was totally ruthless. He had no conscience. I can't really explain why I liked this character so much. I don't EVER want to be like him or do the things he did. There was just something attractive about all his negative personality traits. Before he really starts getting into torturing the cop, he casually turns on the radio as if he needed some music to accompany the grizzly acts he was about to commit. He was a man who insisted on having total control. He liked controlling situations and people. When they were in the jewelry store he advised the employees not to hit the alarm. When they did, he started killing them. This was his way of regaining control of the situation. At the same time he was acting out this concept, he was actually totally out of control. He went fucking crazy in the store. He slaughtered the people lined up in the store like he was shooting clay ducks in a local carnival shooting gallery. I know this is a contradiction, but Mr. Blonde was a contradiction of himself. He had double standards. He hated the cop just because he was a cop. He didn't recognize him as a real person. Mr. Pink and Mr. White confirm this at the warehouse when they discuss him shooting REAL people, which cops are not. They say he just went crazy. They seemed to fear his craziness. His calm facade was a cover for the monstrous things he did to people. When he was in the warehouse with the hostage cop and Mr. Orange he appeared to be very calm. He sat smoking a cigarette while Pink and White argued over the chain of events. He wasn't calm. He couldn't wait to start torturing the hostage cop. You could see it in his face when Pink and White left. He almost looked like a kid left alone to tend a candy store. He was up and going the second they left. He was oh so gruesomely true to his belief that cops weren't people that he begins to prove this through his torture "techniques". He treats the cop like an object as opposed to a human being. He slashes off his ear and speaks into it like it was a play phone. He dances over to the gas can, swirls around the warehouse floor and soaks the guy in gas. He taunts the man by lighting a cigarette and holding it over the puddle of gas. This was a thrilling game to him. He wanted to see this man suffer before he finally died. He was also true to his fellow thugs. When everyone else was panicking, he remained cool. He insisted they stick to their original plan...to the end. He told them he had spoken to Nice Guy Eddie and everything was to be done according to the original plan. Mr. Blonde was a messed up dude. His whole personality was a contradiction. Maybe that's why he was so hypnotizing. His bizarre behavior and calm facade made for a very unique character.

Thursday, March 19, 2020

Public School Licencing essays

Public School Licencing essays FOR POST SECONDARY EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS The purposes of the rules are: (a) To establish a procedure for the licensing of post secondary education institutions (colleges, universities, correspondence schools offering degrees, etc.) with the exception of the University of Wyoming and the Community Colleges of Wyoming (21-2-102 and 21-2-103) or any post-secondary post secondary education institution possessing current accreditation by a recognized and accepted accrediting agency. (b) To establish minimum standards for post secondary education institutions until accreditation by a recognized and accepted accrediting agency may be achieved. (c) To protect persons enrolled in a course of study in post secondary education These rules are promulgated pursuant to W.S. 21-2-401 and 403 of the Private School Licensing Act, and have been adopted by the Wyoming State Board of Education in accordance with the Wyoming Administrative Procedure Act (W.S. 16-3-101 through 16-3-115). They are effective upon filing with the Secretary of State. These rules govern the operation of all post secondary education institutions not accredited by a recognized and accepted accrediting agency as defined by rules of the Wyoming Department of Education, which are located within the state, or have their principal place of business out of state but do business in the state. These rules do not apply to any parochial, church, or religious school as defined by W.S. 21-4-101(a)(iv), home-based educational programs as defined by W.S. 21-4- BC 101(a)(v), aircraft flight training schools approved and authorized by the Federal Aviation Agency of the United States of America, or a school teaching techniques of outdoor recreation, leadership, ecology, or conservation domiciled in the state of Wyoming. nor do they apply to post secondary Instit accredited by a recognized and accepted accrediting agency ...

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Porters Five Forces Explained

Porters Five Forces Explained To describe a competitive environment in a business sphere specialists use Porters five forces analysis. Read what it is, its advantages and disadvantages. Porter’s Five Forces is a fundamental framework that describes the competitive environment. Which competitive environment? Actually, all of them. The basic simplicity of the Five Forces Analysis is what makes it so useful, and why it has become a staple of business and management studies over the past 30 years. If done properly, the Five Forces Analysis can accurately describe any competitive environment at any level. This article about Management/Economics was written by one of our expert writers. If you are looking for an article on Management, Marketing or Economics, is your best bet. Order now and our professionals will write the article you need in accordance with all your requirements. You may like:  Currency Exchange Rate Management and Speculation  |  Management Essay Writing What Are the Five Forces? The visual representation of the Five Forces is most likely familiar to most management students.The degree of competition in a particular market or industry is determined by four primary forces, which are described in relative terms such as strong or weak, or low-medium-high. One thing that may be misleading about the Five Forces framework is that in its familiar form as shown here, it gives the impression that the four forces that affect the intensity of competition act separately when in fact they are all interconnected in sometimes complex ways. In fact, the intensity of competition itself has an effect on the strength of the four forces that define it, which is why the analysis is called the Five Forces. Defining the Five Forces The easiest way to understand what each of the Five Forces is describing is to think of them in the simple context of what would make each of them â€Å"strong† or â€Å"weak†: Factors Contributing to Strength Factors Contributing to Weakness Power of Buyers Fewer buyers Few buyers who purchase a large part of the firm’s output Buyers can easily switch to different product Many buyers Buyers do not have great influence on product or price Buyers cannot easily switch to different product Power of Suppliers Fewer suppliers High cost to change suppliers Strength of buyers can increase power of suppliers over distributors Product is very common or standardized Low cost to change suppliers Weak buyers can decrease power of suppliers over distributors Threat of Substitutions Product is a commodity Weak brand loyalty Few suppliers Product is unique or specialized Strong brand loyalty Many suppliers Threat of New Entrants Common technology Weak brand strength Distribution channels are easily accessible Difficult or proprietary technology required Strong existing brand identification High scale needed Intensity of Competition High costs to exit the industry or market High fixed costs Strong brands Low exit costs Low capital investment or fixed costs Weak brands   These factors are simple examples and are certainly not the only ones that play a role, but should illustrate, at least, how the strengths and weaknesses can affect one another. Application of the Five Forces Analysis The Five Forces analysis is most often used as a tool for external, i.e., third-party analysis of a competitive environment, which is not surprising as it was developed from a thoroughly academic perspective – Michael Porter first devised the Five Forces analysis during his work at the Harvard Business School in the early 1980’s, and despite his characterizing it as a â€Å"strategic management tool†, the methodology has never quite shaken off its textbook charm. In actual practice, the Five Forces analysis is too basic for use as a strategic planning aid for established companies; to put it rather indelicately, if a company is lacking the information a Five Forces analysis provides about its current industry or market, the company probably has more problems than can be solved by the analysis. The Five Forces analysis is, however, a very good assessment to conduct when considering entry into a new market, and is usually included in properly-written business cases . Shortcomings of the Five Forces Analysis The most important thing missing from the Five Forces analysis is any sort of internal perspective, which other assessment tools such as the SWOT analysis do take into consideration. That is not necessarily an oversight – Professor Porter’s focus was on the competitive environment, and from that perspective the Five Forces analysis is set in the proper context – but one criticism that has sometimes been raised in the years since it was first developed is that the Five Forces analysis provides only vague and weak links between the external and internal environments. That can be a problem because the internal environment and activities of the firm do have an impact on competitive forces; without the use of a complementary analysis tool, the Five Forces analysis by itself does not identify or assess what that impact may be. Another potential difficulty in making productive use of the Five Forces analysis is that its conclusions are qualitative; the strength of the various forces can only be described in a relative way, and are subject to interpretation. For example, a relationship between an auto manufacturer and a tire maker that supplies the tires for all the automaker’s new cars could be described in a couple different ways in a Five Forces analysis: The power of the buyer (the automaker) could be described as high because it purchases a large part of the tire manufacturer’s output. The power of the supplier (the tire maker) could alternatively be described as high, depending on how specialized their tire is. The power of both the supplier and buyer could be affected one way or the other by the brand loyalty of consumers to the tire brand or the auto marque. For the student researcher or market analyst, then, the challenge is to fully investigate the underlying conditions that make a particular force â€Å"strong† or â€Å"weak†, and justify a conclusion that does not contradict a conclusion about one or more of the other forces. On the other hand, when one of these contradictions cannot be resolved even after a thorough investigation and analysis, it reveals a critical issue for the firm or market in question, and this can be an opportunity – for the academic researcher, it is likely that the problem will be a solid new area for study, and for businesses, it is likely a problem whose solution will give them a strong competitive advantage. If you need to analyze a scientific work in greater detail contact our writing department to avoid confusion and save your time. 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Saturday, February 15, 2020

Arguementative Research Paper Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

Arguementative Research Paper - Essay Example In addition, low unemployment levels in the nation do not infer that all working people are well-off. Homelessness problem is growing dramatically in America. It is a non-discriminative problem that can strike anyone without any expectation. Therefore, homelessness is a social problem and crisis affecting our society. Addressing the problem of homelessness calls the entire nation for togetherness to create solutions to the growing epidemic of homeless people. Statistics shows that people living in poverty are standing the most risk of becoming homeless. The homeless are also at risk of losing the little they already have. The number of homeless people and children has greatly increased in the past decade. They are about 40 percent of people who are homeless. In the rural areas, the largest people who are homeless are single mothers, families and children. In a 1998 survey done in 30 cities by U.S Conference of Mayors, it was determined that the homeless population consist of 35 percent Caucasian and 53 percent of African-American. Four percent were Native Americans while 12 percent and three percent were Hispanic and Asian respectively. The ethnic make-up of the homeless population varies depending on geographic location (Arnaudo, Madrid & Zappasodi 10-11). There is a relationship between poverty and homelessness. In most cases, poor people are not able to pay for education, food, child care, housing, and health care. These populations have to make difficult choices when small income can only cover some of these necessities. Evidence shows that low, poor employment opportunities for the huge number of the work force increases poverty. Less secure jobs and falling incomes which provide fewer benefits results into additional financial strain on already financially burdened people. The link between homelessness and impoverished workers is in the homeless shelters, many of which houses significant numbers of full-time wage earners. According to the 1998 US